Thursday, December 29, 2011

Meet the Juror: A Conversation with Allyn Bromley

Yesterday’s receiving day for the 2012 Hui No’eau Annual Juried Exhibition yielded 306 original works of art from artists living on Maui, throughout Hawaii, and beyond. The Kaluanui living & dining areas, now public exhibition spaces, were bursting at the seams with art of all media. Our hard-working exhibitions & events coordinator, Rachel Edelman, could not keep the staff away from the space- our reactions to the work bouncing off the walls barely faster than the some 30 Camp Kaluanui keiki bustling through the grounds at recess. Simply put: receiving day is awesome. The energy of the artists and volunteers, the suspense of not knowing who will submit, the excitement of meeting new faces, and the exceptionally broad range of artwork making its way into the house all combine to make these days stand out as some of the most fun we see.

Today I was introduced to the woman facing the greatest challenge of all the artists combined, Honolulu-based Allyn Bromley who has been working all day to jury this most competitive exhibition. Rachel and I were invited into the Hui’s artist cottage, where she is staying while on Maui, to share some lunch together during a much-needed break and to chat about the selection process.

A bit about Allyn, who has lived and worked in Honolulu since the early 1950s before earning a BFA from the University of Hawai‘I and MFA from the University of Colorado. She has done post-graduate work at Pratt Graphic Center in Manhattan, and at Rochester Institute of Technology and the University of Washington. Allyn retired from teaching printmaking at the University of Hawai‘i in 2000 to pursue further explorations in the art of the print. Her current interests are in deconstructing the screen printed format to recombine and reconstruct images in the third dimension.

Allyn is an elegant, thoughtful, fascinating woman. When asked “so, how’s it going?” her response was this: “it’s a tough challenge being a solo juror, because the exhibition is based completely on my opinion. And my opinions are rooted in my belief that art is an important part of a social context. I see this Hui exhibition as a symposium for ideas, for taking art forward and for reflecting what we are today.” It was clear that Allyn was facing a thrilling challenge brought on by our artist community.

I proceeded to explain to Allyn that one of the greatest challenges we face is responding to the artists whose work was not selected by a given juror. In other words, “why are you making the selections you’re making?”

“So much of what I’m seeing is skillful, beautifully crafted, or dazzling- but lacking the relevance needed to actively engage in a communal discussion," she responded, "This is a forum beyond the decorative. In some cases I was drawn to pieces that I would hang in my own home, but this was not their place. Many other pieces simply needed their own, separate space, and by including them here the whole room would have been thrown off. Then there were pieces selected for the exhibition that don’t speak to me, but I found it important that they be SEEN. They have formal values, things about them that are interesting, they’re provocative, they represent new ideas.”

Ultimately, Allyn is creating a cohesive, visual conversation with the space offered to her. In her artist’s statement, she uses key words like structure and technical skill as well as sincerity and passion.

When asked what it was like to observe Allyn’s process, Rachel responds, “She has been incredibly thoughtful. Every piece has had an equal opportunity to be included. Lots of time went into the selection process. The “logic vs. instinct” dichotomy she explained in her lecture last night was clearly visible- and her instinct does not trump the logic here.”

“I’m a mother and a teacher,” continued Allyn, “I want to encourage people and I want everybody to be realized in their artistic endeavors, which makes the jurying process even more difficult for me. I almost feel like a midwife whose responsibility is to assist in putting something out into the world that will take the whole dialogue of art further. Art must be intellectually challenging. We’re not here to passively look at what has been said over the years, no matter how beautiful it is, it has to be reflective of who we are as a people.”

Please join us next Friday, January 6th at 5 pm to view the final selections, meet many of the artists, and have a first chance to make a purchase. All sales support the educational programs of Hui No’eau, one of Maui’s only remaining nonprofit visual arts education center.

Mahalo nui loa to Jack & Carolyn Schaefer Gray, Robert & Frances Davidson, and Louis & Jolene Cole for sponsoring this important exhibition.

-Kelly McHugh, Youth Programs & Marketing Manager

Tuesday, December 20, 2011

A Day at the Hui

Mahalo to Hui Development Assistant Tara Crawford for sharing her "day in the life at the Hui" photo shoot with us, starring the awesomeness of 8-year old Kirra Crawford.

"Here are some pictures from Kirra's adventures in Hui-land. She looks like Alice in Wonderland running away from me outside. If people only realized how much fun children could have exploring Kaluanui!"

Posing inside of Patrick Dougherty's "On the Wild Side"

Strawberry guava in a strawberry dress

Enjoying the dazzling DRESS holiday installation piece led by visionary Andre Morissette with the help of Maggie Costigan, Mary Grandy, Caroline Killhour, Mary Ann Lambert, Kathy Marchetti, Kerry Nel, Darrell Orwig, Karuna Santoro, Cristina Schenk, Nancy Skrimstad, Marc Tolliver and Billy Welker.

Warming up by the fireplace

Subtly hinting to mom which Hui Holidays pieces she wants for Christmas!

Lucky, lucky girl! Someone got special permission from the Executive Director for this shot!

Ready to get lost in the Hui's bamboo forest

In search of jackson lizards

From the photo studio to the solarium she goes

And into the garden...

Thursday, December 15, 2011

Hui Announces Acquisition Award Selection Committee Visit by the Hawai‘i State Foundation on Culture and the Arts for '12 Annual Juried Exhibition


Hui No‘eau is proud to announce that its 2012 Annual Juried Exhibition has been selected by the Hawai‘i State Foundation on Culture and the Arts (HSFCA) for a formal exhibition visit by their Acquisition Award Selection Committee.

Part of the State’s Art in Public Places Program, which serves to strengthen the State Foundation’s capability to "stimulate, guide and promote culture and the arts, history and the humanities" through the field of the visual arts, the Committee makes recommendations to the HSFCA regarding the purchase of works of art. Selected artwork is then rotated throughout Hawai‘i state buildings to ensure the widest possible audiences have access to view these works thereby enhancing the environmental quality of state public places; cultivating the public's awareness, understanding and appreciation of visual arts; contributing to the development and recognition of a professional artistic community; and preserving works of art expressive of the character of the Hawaiian Islands.

When asked why this program is vital to our larger Hawaiian community and why the Hui’s community should pay attention, HSFCA Executive Director Ron Yamakawa remarked, “Since the Hawai`i State Legislature passed the Art-in-State-Buildings Law in 1967, Hawai`i has become the first state to set aside one percent of the cost of state buildings to acquire and commission works of visual art that beautify and humanize the built environment. Advancing the concept of a statewide “museum without walls,” the program expands aesthetic opportunities as part of daily life and enables people of all communities on all islands to obtain aesthetic and educational experiences from art in public places. It stimulates broader interest in works by local artists and recognizes the professional achievements of visual artists by presenting recognition awards for outstanding works of art at selected exhibitions.”

Hui No‘eau Executive Director Caroline Killhour goes on to say, “It is the Hui’s highest honor to be selected for an exhibition visit by the state- one that will be shared with our artists community and truly raise the bar for what has become the most competitive exhibition of our annual repertoire. We can hardly wait to see the work that comes out this year, and invite our entire Maui ‘ohana to share the power of creativity with us all.”

Receiving day for the 2012 Hui No‘eau Annual Juried Exhibition is Wednesday, December 28, 2011 / 9am – 4pm, with the exhibition running January 7 – February 19, Monday through Saturday, 10 am – 4 pm. There is no cost to view this exhibition, or to enjoy the Hui’s Kaluanui estate.

ABOUT THE 2012 HUI NO‘EAU ANNUAL JURIED EXHIBITION
Generously sponsored by Jack & Carolyn Schaefer Gray, Robert & Fran Davidson and Louis & Jolene Cole, this prestigious multi-media arts competition offers an opportunity to view the current work of Hui members as well as participate in topics upon which contemporary minds are engaged. Nationally renowned guest jurors represent respected curators and artists from Maui, Hawai‘i and beyond, offering a different perspective for a unique and fresh show every year. With only 53 pieces selected from a record-breaking 306 entries last year, the Hui No‘eau Annual Juried Exhibition continues to represent a highly competitive and valued program in our visual arts community.

This year the Hui is fortunate to welcome distinguished juror and printmaking artist Allyn Bromley, who remarks “I am delighted to be offered the experience of jurying for Hui No‘eau. The work that I have seen there is of high quality and serious intent, and it is my pleasure to work with the Hui to select another exhibition of their best. As an artist trained in an era of formalism, the fundamentals of art making are important to me. I respond to the elements and principles of structure, the varieties of expression, and the technical skills of the artist. More than that, however, are the unquantifiable components of a work, the sincerity with which the artist works, the ideas and selection of materials to express those ideas, and the obsession or passion of a work — those things interest me as well. Being a sole juror is a responsibility I take seriously. I look forward to my part in helping make this exhibition as successful as your past exhibitions have been.”

Receiving Day: Wednesday, December 28, 2011 / 9am – 4pm
Lecture with the Juror: December 28 / 4:30-5:30pm / FREE
Exhibition Dates: January 7 – February 19, 2012
Members’ Opening Reception: Friday, January 6, 2012 / 5 – 7pm

This exhibition is free and open to the public. Exhibition hours: January 7 – February 19, 2012, open Monday – Saturday from 10 am – 4 pm.

ABOUT THE HUI NO‘EAU EXHIBITION PROGRAM
The purpose of the Hui No‘eau Exhibition Program is to cultivate in the public a fuller appreciation of and interest in art by promoting cultural exchange, spurring dialogue, and enhancing awareness of and providing access to the visual arts—creating a space for community arts. As an organization dedicated to enabling community access to the broad range of benefits offered by the visual arts, we consistently seek individual artists that can handle the challenge of translating complex ideas into imagery, allowing our constituency to learn, question or become inspired to create in their own way.

“There are very few venues here on Maui where art can be shown in a proper way. The fact that any Maui resident or Hui member has the opportunity to exhibit in this setting is truly a gift. We are so lucky to have a community that supports the arts and I feel thankful to have the Hui as a place of inspiration, collaboration, and community to keep me growing as an artist!” —Tim Garcia

Hui No‘eau is committed to exhibiting and supporting artists working in Hawai‘i as well as those with a connection to the state. Since 1977 the gallery, free and open to the public six days a week, has focused on exhibiting Hawai‘i artists, mounting 6-8 exhibitions a year with over 350 participants annually. Exhibitions at the Hui are presented to support artists and to educate and inspire the 16,000 visitors to the gallery each year.

ABOUT HUI NO`EAU VISUAL ARTS CENTER
The mission of Hui No`eau is to unlock creativity through exceptional visual arts education. The Hui provides a wide range of programs that support lifelong learning in the arts including public classes and visiting artist workshops, open studios, lectures, exhibitions, community art events, historical house tours and educational outreach programs with schools and community partner organizations. One of the last of its kind on Maui, the Hui is a nonprofit, non-degree granting, community arts education organization offering open access to quality arts instruction by teaching artists. Our programs and services are accessible to all, regardless of artistic aptitude or ability to pay tuition.

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Wednesday, November 16, 2011

2011 Portfolio Day: Mahalo!

Mahalo nui loa to Cari L. McIalwain, Cornish College of the Arts (Seattle, WA), Robynne C. Royster, California College of the Arts (San Francisco, CA), Holly McVeigh, Pacific Northwest College of Art (Portland, OR) and Lauren Hogan, School of the Art Institute of Chicago (Chicago, IL) for your exceptional service to our Maui youth during this year’s Portfolio Day event! With students represented by King Kekaulike, Maui High, Seabury Hall, Kamehameha and even a few home-schooled teens, the event was a terrific success in terms of information, guidance, and exchange. We hope to see you all again next November!




Monday, October 31, 2011

5th Annual Portfolio Day @ the Hui

Robynne Royster, California College of the Arts, enthusiastically offers feedback about student work at the Hui's Portfolio Day event.

Mark your calendars! The 5th annual Portfolio Day has been scheduled for Wednesday, November 9th from 3 pm – 7 pm in the Hui Solarium. This FREE event features admissions representatives from top art colleges & universities and serves as an unbelievable opportunity for potential college students to receive thorough, one-on-one critiques of their work as well as professional guidance for a future career in the arts.

WHAT: Specifically developed for those interested in pursuing a career in the arts, this free program offers concentrated one-on-one consultations with experienced representatives from fine arts colleges. Portfolio Day encourages open dialogue about student work, addresses questions about college plans and supports exchange amongst all participants, offering so much more than your average college fair.

Portfolios should include a student’s best and most recent work, but can also include works in progress, sketchbooks and other samples. Students should expect to hear many different opinions of their work and be prepared to explain how they developed their ideas and vision.

WHY: This FREE event is a pivotal opportunity for young artists. It validates their inspired displays of self-expression as a means for building a successful future. It gives teens a chance to get their creative juices flowing and have their personal concerns addressed about college outside of the classroom; in a setting that is less obviously structured and conducive to more informal mentoring relationships with adults. Offering it for free enables access to anyone & everyone, which is an important factor for the Hui to consider as we continue to develop not only as a Maui arts focal point, but as a community center.

WHERE: Hui No’eau Visual Arts Center, 2841 Baldwin Avenue in Makawao, 808.572.6560, huinoeau.com

REPS:
Cari L. McIalwain, Cornish College of the Arts: Seattle, WA
Robynne C. Royster, California College of the Arts: San Francisco, CA
Holly McVeigh, Pacific Northwest College of Art: Portland, OR

NOTE: Consultations are schedule on a first-come-first-served basis; we do not offer pre-registration. Because timeslots are extremely limited, we suggest you arrive promptly at 3:00 pm to sign up with the school of your choice.

Read about this event in the news.
Read last year's blog post.

Friday, October 28, 2011

Visualizing Green: Just 2 Weeks Left!

On Saturday, October 22nd, Hui No`eau continued its FREE Artist Talk program by hosting its second artist walk-through of the current Visualizing Green exhibition (on view through November 12th). Participating artists included Kathy Sakai ("Green Scape"), Tony Walholm ("The Green Heart of the Rainforest, the Breath of Life") and Jon Graham ("Green Light"), who shared insights about their work, including inspiration, techniques, thoughts on the "green" theme, and much more.

The dialogue between the artists and visitors stretched beyond just the artwork on the wall. Mixed-media painter Kathy Sakai started by describing a material called yupo, an extremely malleable surface which after painting and drawing upon, slowly extracts color and depth — a process of removing and showing what underneath. Kathy revealed that she'd used only blue and yellow paint, letting her materials guide her.

Hui instructor and renowned painter Tony Walholm had come prepared with close to ten pages of notes, explaining his painting's symbolism and representation of a river flowing through the rain forest powered with the breath of life. Tony also spoke about his method as an artist and his eternal inspiration, master painter Wassily Kandinsky — painting as a philosophy of breaking the bounds of the ego and coming from the purest spiritual self that is inside all of us.

Finally, Jon Graham presented his painting of one of our island's landmarks, an old cane shed just above Skill Village in Paia. His piece was inspired by the color green, the simple beauty of the structure and its irregularities, and the history of the industry it represents, lending a special significance to Maui residents who've seen major changes occur on the island over time. Jon also talked about the source material used to create his picture frame, handmade from wood found by the ocean.

Stay tuned for more opportunities for Maui's art community to meet Hui's exhibiting artists at these free walk-through's during our highly anticipated Hui No‘eau Annual Juried Exhibition 2012", in January.

Read about previous Artist Talk here.
Read more about the exhibition on our website.

Mahalo to Claudio Marchetti for his report!

Monday, October 24, 2011

The Art of Taste: Wailea Food & Wine Celebration

On Friday, November 18th, 2011, Hui No`eau will celebrate its 5th annual Wailea Food & Wine Celebration at the beautiful Hotel Wailea.

This relaxing event features exquisite tastings by Maui's top chefs & vintners- all gathering in support of visual arts education on Maui. With past years’ esteemed company including vintners from Grgich Hills Estate, Jordan Winery, Justin Vineyards & Winery and Shafer Vineyards & chefs from Capische, Five Palms Restaurant, MCC Culinary Academy and Spago Maui, this year's event promises food and wine of the highest caliber.

In a recent conversation with event partner Chambers & Chambers Wine Merchants' Charles Fredy (also an Advanced Sommelier and Certified Specialist of Wine), we were delighted by the natural relationship that became apparent between experimenting in the artist studio and exercising the sense of “taste”- which this event promises to make valuable use of!

Hui: Why should someone completely new to the world of wine tasting attend this event as well as a seasoned "taster”?

Charles: Simply put: because the wines are amazing! This is not just another special event that we are participating in with a small selection of wines, this is our trade show; we’re bringing out the big guns (150-200 of our highest quality/ rarest variety of wines). We typically do not even open some of these bottles (Turley, Peter Michael, Shafer, Paul Meyer- we’re even bringing a Hillside Select: which incredibly, incredibly rare). The majority of these bottles are twice the cost of the ticket to your event; the value is extraordinary. Additionally, your guests will have the chance to actually meet the owners of these wineries, which adds a whole other element to the enjoyment & experience of the wines themselves.

Hui: What advice do you have for a new “taster” (like myself) that might feel somewhat intimidated by the vast world of wine?

Charles: Just have fun! Be sure to walk into the event with a very open mind; don’t get stuck drinking the wine you always drink. This is the time to experiment and really come in with an open palate. If you don’t like it, move on. This is not an opportunity you can take advantage of at a restaurant (once you order a bottle, you’re stuck finishing it). Ask lots of questions and take advantage of the experts. Tell them what you’re about to eat and ask what they might pair it with. You will be so surprised with what you come away with.

Hui: This is a great partnership for Chambers & Chambers and the Hui, because this is exactly the message we relay to our core audience of artists and collectors: to take risks, have fun, try something new and sit back and enjoy the results.

Charles: Exactly, I think it’s important to mention that the types of producers of the wines we are featuring are what we refer to as “artisan wine makers” or “artisan wine producers.” Compared to others in the field that have strict procedures for producing & creating for the masses, they pride themselves on being more artistic and intimate in their approach to winemaking. They are farmers that really care about what they do and want to express the most enjoyment in those they touch with their art. These are small, passionate owners & wine makers that try to make wines of pure artistic expression.

A fundraiser developed over the years with the support of printmaking artist, studio user and Chambers & Chambers wine educator Jim Powlan, the Wailea Food & Wine Celebration celebrates the value of our public open studio program and engages our community in an off-site neighborhood.

“As a talented and successful artist, exceptional student, inspired open studio participant and active volunteer at Hui No‘eau, Jim’s enthusiasm in the planning and promotion of this event exhibits an exemplary model of volunteerism that is vital to our continued success, remarks Hui Executive Director Caroline Killhour, “His innovation and hard work is a testament to his commitment to community collaboration. We sincerely thank him, his wife, Barbara Fong and VP of Sales and Marketing Charles Fredy, for their extraordinary support of the Hui and of community arts education on Maui.”

Tickets to this event are just $150, ($100 of which is tax deductible)! Purchase by Nov 4th for a chance to win "Ripeness Begins Corrupting Every Tree" by printmaking artist Brad Brown, valued at $500. Winning guests must be present at time of drawing. Visit the Hui online to purchase your tickets today or call (808) 572-6560.

Tuesday, October 18, 2011

Meet the Artists of Visualizing Green

This past Saturday (Oct. 15), Hui No`eau hosted its first of two FREE October artist walk-through's of the current Visualizing Green exhibition. Featuring artists Gabrielle Anderman (Juror's Choice for "i'm so green"), William Worcester ("Almost Ripe") and Sidney Yee ("I No Kea, No..I Kea"), artists spoke to an intimate group of 15 sharing insights about their work -- including inspiration, techniques, thoughts on the "green" theme, and opinions about the exhibition as a whole. Cherie Attix, who had come to hear her fellow exhibiting artists speak, was invited to take the stage as well, discussing her piece "Loulu Old Hawaii."

Artist excerpts:

Gabby describes her artistic process this way: "I work with acrylic, charcoal, china marker and pencil on both paper and canvas. As part of my process, I layer multiple images on top of one another and include words and phrases pulled from books, memories, journals and dreams."

In her written statement, Anderman remarks, "I think everyone should have a cape and a mask. Why not? Why should superman have all the fun? Let’s all put on our tutus and pour ketchup on ourselves and pretend we’re dead and then when someone walks up we’ll jump up and dance around laughing at them for being scared. That would be funny and scary."

Sidney's textural and evocative piece, he says, "Represents a typical theme of good versus evil. Good is represented by the ama'u fern plant which is indigenous to Hawaii. It is being invaded by the wild boars which is destroying our watershed. The color green is symbolic of all things good and the rough textured dark area in contrast is the evil element that can only be controlled with our intervention."

Cherie explains about her piece, "My beloved 1924 home, Hale Ho‘okipa Inn, and the Loulu palms growing near the house were my inspiration." Her woodcut came to life this way: "The creative process was a progression from studying and photographing my subject, to creating a collage out of the photos, next doing my drawing, carving the woodblock, then printing, and for the last step, I hand painted the print with water color."

Bill Worcester, a star volunteer with the Patrick Dougherty Stickwork installation, wrapped up the afternoon by leading the group outside to the sculpture, where he talked story about his experiences building with the 2011 Artist-in-Residence.

Missed the walk-through on the 15th? Join three more exhibiting artists this Saturday, October 22nd at noon for a FREE walk-through of the show: painter Jon Graham, mixed-media painter Kathy Sakai, and painter & Hui instructor Tony Walholm.

See you at the Hui!

Artist Bill Worcester addresses the group.

Juror's Choice "i'm so green" by Gabrielle Anderman

Sidney Yee shares a story about his "I No Kea, No..I Kea"

Monday, September 26, 2011

Day 16 & 17 with Dougherty: On the Wild Side

We all knew this moment would come; the feeling that “it’s all gone by so fast!”

In the final days of sculpture installation, crew members clipped, fastened, mulched, and made time to just stand back and relish in the final touches of the near 80 x 20 x 20 sculpture cooperatively named “On the Wild Side.” On Thursday, September 22, Patrick hosted a “Dinner with Dougherty” benefit at the Hui where he shared colorful anecdotes about his time and work at the Hui with 50 project supporters. Friday, September 23, marked the blessing and opening celebration of the final sculpture, marking a new beginning for Ho`ololi: the Environmental Art Garden – a new public art program that will to continue to cultivate community and raise awareness about Hawai‘i’s endangered ecosystems by inspiring conversation, encouraging public participation, and creating fellowship between artists and environmentalists.

The free opening celebration was attended by nearly 300 guests and featured information booths for conservationist groups like Community Work Day, East Maui Watershed Partnership Partnership, Leeward Haleakala Watershed Partnership and Maui Invasive Species Committee; a lei making workshop led by our very own Jessica Hoecker; live music by Hawaiian slack key guitarist John “Keoni” Trino; and artist meet-and-greets of those featured in the current Visualizing Green exhibition in the main gallery.

Mahalo to our day 16 & 17 crew:
Bill Worcester
Carla Thistle
Claudio Johnson
Ed Weller
Elaine
Frank Kane
Janet Davis
Jenn Atkinson
Joan Nielsen
Kim Harter
Linda Schenk
Nathalie Nunez
Patrick Dougherty
Rachel Ray
Ryan Rea
Tara Branham




ABOUT: Guided by legendary Stickwork sculptor Patrick Dougherty, who has completed more than 200 such installations worldwide, nearly 200 volunteers worked closely together for 17 days to remove thousands of saplings of invasive strawberry guava, white ash and eucalyptus from protected forest areas; transport them to the Hui; dig deep holes in the ground to firmly lodge base saplings; and bend, twist and weave together what slowly evolved into a piece Dougherty aptly named “On the Wild Side.” A project developed over the course of 2 years, this large-scale masterpiece was made possible by hundreds of inspired donors, volunteers, collaborators, and other supporters. The projected lifespan of this sculpture is 3 years (September 2011 – September 2014).

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

Day 15 with Dougherty: Art & Nature for Kids

Three school groups joined us at the Hui today for “Explore & Discover” field trips designed in conjunction with Dougherty’s artist residency. Nearly 40 children worked with Hui teaching artists Shay Hoffer & Curtis Yu to create artwork inspired by nature, learn about invasive species from MISC education specialist Lissa Fox Strohecker, take a tour of the Visualizing Green exhibition in our main gallery, meet & greet a featured artist exhibited in the show, enjoy a Stickwork demo with Dougherty’s art assistant, Nathalie Nunez, and be amongst the first to experience a walk-through of the larger-than-life sculpture, which will be formally unveiled to the public at tomorrow’s blessing & opening celebration. Students were beside themselves with excitement as they had a chance to meet Patrick Dougherty, take pictures in front of the work of art and have Stickwork books signed. It was a fitting addition to the level of energy, excitement and productivity as we all work together to complete the sculpture before Patrick’s departure on Saturday morning. Only 1 day to go! A bittersweet reality.

Keiki pose with their new "Wrapped up in Nature" workshop creations

Nunez asks the group to guess what kind of invasive species we're using today in the sculpture

Caroline Killhour addresses the group, responding to oodles of questions about her artwork in the Visualizing Green exhibition

Maizie Sanford stops by to visit the sculpture...and her mother's childhood home, the Hui!

Mahalo to today's Stickwork crew:
Birgitte Golden
Chet Witek
Elaine
Jenny-li Hellsen
Julia Baldwin
Kathy Yoo
Nicklaus Yoo
Steve Yoo
Taylor Nevhoff
Bill Worcester
Frank Kane
Hanna Hammerli
Irene Gombac
Judy Bisgard
Nathalie Nunez
Patrick Dougherty
Ryan Rea

Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Day 10 – 14 with Dougherty: More Sticks!

If you watched the video on this blog post, you’ll note some cheering & laughter as we prematurely celebrated the abundant harvest of materials we gathered over the course of 3-days expected to complete Dougherty's gigantic work of public art.

Well, if you haven’t guessed by now- we needed more!

We have been so fortunate to have such devoted, inspired, energetic volunteers working with us on this project; hundreds of community members have been stepping up to the plate, tools in hand, ready and willing to snip, cut, truck, weave, rake, and just pitch in in any way they can throughout the duration of this sculpture installation. A special mahalo to the State Department of Land & Natural Resources for facilitating the permit process (again & again) and for offering so many helping hands over the course of the last week as we collected additional white ash in Makawao Forest Reserve and strawberry guava in Huelo.

We’re nearly finished!

Mahalo to the latest crew members, many of which have put in multiple days of volunteerism!
Amy Chang
Ana Olvera
Anne-Marie Forsythe
Bill Worcester
Carla Schneider
Carla Thistle
Carol Childerhouse
Caroline Killhour
Claudia Johnson
Claudio Marchetti
Dan Cho
David & Kathy Parish
Dep't of Land & Natural Resources Crew
Don May
Ed Weller
Elaine Wender
Elizabeth
Frank
Gilson Killhour
Heidi Karin Konwalinka
Irene Gombac
Jane Honeycutt
Janet Davis
Jenny-Li
Joan Veilsen
Joani Hixen
John Cassel
Jonie
Judy Bisgard
Julio Spee
Kari McCarthy
Kay Mcleaod
Kelly McHugh
Lana Coryell
Leaf Van Alstine
Linda Proshe
Linda Weller
Lorne Boyd
Mary Grandy
Miguel Rivas
Nathalie Nunez
Patrick Dougherty
Rachel Deboer
Rachel Edelman
Rachel Hecksher
Rachel Hodara
Robert Meyer
Robin Ferrier
Ryan Rea
Sandy Rice
Sara Farrignton
Stephanie Cliffton
Suzzana Goodwin
Tim Farrington
Tim Garcia
Tom Faught
Wolfgang Beoker
Wolfram Schenk

Don’t forget, the sculpture blessing & opening celebration is scheduled for THIS FRIDAY, September 23 from 5 – 7 pm at Hui No`eau. Please gather your friends and family to help us bid Dougherty a warm aloha and congratulate the hundreds of volunteers and supporters that have made this incredible experience possible. See you there!




video

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

Day 9 with Dougherty: Meet & Greet

Today's Brown Bag Lunch event featured a meet & greet with artist Patrick Dougherty and preliminary overview of how the Stickwork sculpture will develop toward its completion in just 9 short days. Guests enjoyed a homemade meal by board members Shannon Hoekstra & Tim Garcia and eagerly signed up as volunteers for today's afternoon shift. We had a great turnout, with more than 20 pair of hands on deck as we weaved 'til our heart's content!

Mahalo to today's crew:
Anne-Marie Forsythe
Bill Worcester
Carrie
Charlie Noland
Elaine
Heidi Karin Konwalinka
Husa
Janet Davis
Jarod Mower
Joan Nielsen
Judy Bisgard
Julio Spee
Kelly McHugh
Keri Meyer
Lana Coryell
Larry Lamber
Leaf Van Alstine
Nathalie Nunez
Patrick Dougherty
Ryan Rea
Tim Garcia

Hui volunteers & guests enjoy a delicious gourmet lunch, prepared by board members Shannon Hoekstra and Tim Garcia. Mahalo to you both!

Longtime Hui volunteer and former board president Judy Bisgard prepares to weave eucalyptus leaves into the initial structures.

Staff member Kelly McHugh poses as a beautiful bird in her nest for photographer (and former Pippers model) Anne-Marie Forsythe

Lana Coryell, Keri Meyer, Anne-Marie Forsythe & Judy Bisgard inside of the sculpture

Don't forget tomorrow's artist talk & panel discussion with Dougherty and friends, an intimate occasion to learn about the artist's 30-year history doing this work and to contribute to a communal dialogue about why & how artists and environmentalists can activate social change by working together.
Pass it on!

Monday, September 12, 2011

Day 8 with Dougherty: The Form Unforms

Dougherty's crescent-shaped forms are rapidly unfolding on the grounds of Hui No`eau, as he and his right-hand woman, Nathalie Nunez, lead a new crew of volunteers each day in the in's & out's of Stickwork construction. Take a look:





Mahalo to today's crew:
Becky Lewis
Bill Worcester
Carla Thistle
Chris Miller
Claudia Johnson
Fiama Von Shuetze
Francis Kone
Jeanne Paynick
Jill Bernshause
Judy Bisgard
Michelle Jewell
Nathalie Nunez
Patrick Dougherty
Rose Gabriel
Zoe Brownbird

We are offering 2 exciting opportunities this week to meet the artist and learn more about how and why this project came to be: 1) A luncheon at 12:00 pm today (September 13), compliments of Hui board members Shannon Hoekstra & Tim Garcia and 2) An artist talk, slideshow and panel discussion this Thursday, (September 15)/ FREE, moderated by Keith Wolter, Executive Director of the Maui AIDS Foundation and host of KAOI's Maui Non-Profit Directors Association Radio Show, with panelists Patrick Dougherty, Arts & Science Illustrator Ghalib El-Khalidi, Hui Executive Director Caroline Killhour, Founder and Board President of Hawaiian Islands Land Trust Helen Nielsen, and Maui Invasive Species Committee Manager Teya Penniman. Learn more here.

If you would like to join us for lunch today, please call 572-6560 to pre-order ($25/ person). Thursday's artist talk & panel discussion is FREE, beginning at 5:30 pm. We hope you'll join us!

Day 5-7 with Dougherty: Setting & Weaving

It was a great weekend of scaffolding, digging, de-leafing and large-scale weaving with Dougherty and some 60 volunteers. We are clearly beginning to see the artist's vision in the sculpture that is developing here at Hui No`eau. With only a week & a half to go, there's plenty of work to be done!







We hope to see you at tomorrow's Brown Bag Lunch event and Thursday's Artist Talk & Panel Discussion (details here), both great opportunities to chat with the team and learn more about this groundbreaking program. Visit us online for more.

Mahalo to the following for their hard work and infectious energy this weekend:

Friday's crew:

Carla Thistle

Claudio Marchetti

Elaine Wender

Heide Karin Konwalinka

Julie Spee

Kelly Cannon

Larry Lambert

Lorne Boyd

Luana Coonen

Michael Stone

Nathalie Nunez

Patrick Dougherty

Renee Sante

Rose Gabriel

Tara Branham

William Worcester


Saturday's crew:

Ashley Cooper

Bev Linquist

Briget Ryan

Carla Thistle

Carol Schwarz

Christine Macdonald

Cliris Cruikshank

Colin Meston

Gena Ryan

Grace Woods

Karuna Santoro

Lorne Boyd

Marlee Blakeman

Maya Okamara

Nathalie Nunez

Neil Waring

Patrick Dougherty

Pua Logan

Rachel Deboer

Rita Ryan

Rose Gabriel

Ryan Rea


Sunday's crew:

Amy Puz

Bev Lindquist

Bill worcester

Carla Thistle

Christine Macdonal

Elizabeth Michalkow

Grace Woods

Heidi Konwalinka

Jenny Sheeham

Kyle Barnett

Miranda Camp

Nathalie Nunez

Patrick Dougherty

Pua Logan

Ryan Rea

Ted Krawczyle

Thursday, September 8, 2011

Day 4 with Dougherty: Setting the Base

The base sticks are set! Today was spent drilling 60 holes into the build site- about 2 feet deep, where the large strawberry guava sapling base will outline Dougherty’s sculpture- and setting the initial trees into place. Take a look:

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It's harder than it looks, folks

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The thrilling maiden saplings enter Hui soil!

Mahalo to today's crew for your hard work
and a great launch to the build portion of the project:

Becky Lewis
Bill Worcester
Chris Cruikshank
Claudio Marchetti
Courtney Turner
Elaine Wender
Heide Karin Konwalinka
Julio Spee
Kathleen MacDonal
Kay McLeod
Leaf Van Alstine
Lorne Boyd
Nathalie Nunez
Patrick Dougherty
Ryan Rea
Tara Branham

Only 15 days until the unveiling and blessing of the final sculpture: Friday, September 23 at 5:00 pm/ FREE at Hui No`eau. Don't forget, there's still plenty of time to get involved over the next 2 weeks: volunteer, take a class, rent Hui space for a party or special event, attend an artist talk, join us for a special dinner with Dougherty, and more! Take a look at the program web page here.

Drill, baby, drill!

The base.

Wednesday, September 7, 2011

Day 3 with Dougherty: From Polipoli to the Hui

Today’s volunteers on the 3rd and final harvest day for the gigantic Stickwork sculpture were split into 2 groups; half to gather, chop and bundle eucalyptus in Polipoli State Park and the other half to collect the unbelievably abundant collection of strawberry guava from Monday’s Huelo harvest. Both known as invasives here on Maui, eucalyptus and strawberry guava are non-indigenous species that invade native habitats causing negative affects to the area environmentally and ecologically, which means they virtually choke out most all other native plant-life like a weed.
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While the main goal of the past 3 days has been to accumulate enough material to create a work of art, countless takeaways have followed us back home. Working alongside DLNR & MISC has been a truly educational experience, as Hui staff, board members, artists and friends engaged in thoughtful discussion throughout each day learning more and more about the importance of safeguarding our natural island resources. It has been rewarding to also be able to share our point of view with these groups about how art can create a bridge of understanding the seemingly overwhelming environmental issues they tackle through their organizational missions- helping to attract and engage new audiences with a hands-on, aesthetically beautiful project that will serve to inspire a new wave of community discourse.

We will be talking more about this topic at next Thursday’s (Sept 15) artist talk & panel discussion, FREE, beginning at 5:30 pm. We would love to hear what you think! In the meantime, please visit us at the Hui between now and September 23rd to witness the live exhibition that will become Patrick Douugherty’s Stickwork installation.

Visit us online for other opportunities to spend time with the artist and your local arts community. Check out our Facebook page for photos, videos & more.

Lissa Fox (MISC), Anne Marie Forsythe (Hui) & Rose Gabriel (volunteer) after a long day collecting eucalyptus in Polipoli

Volunteers load Tim Garcia's truck with strawberry guava in Huelo

Rachel Hodara after a long day of awesome

The afternoon crew after unloading a tractor-trailer of guava

A big Mahalo to today's crew:

Abelardo Rojas Umana
Anne-Marie Forsythe
Carl Polk
Christian Visoria
Gabe Mott
Gilson Killhour
Heide Karin Konwalinka
Jared Barros
Julio
Kelly McHugh
Lana Coryell
Lance De Silva & crew
Larry Lambert
Lissa Fox
Miguel Rivas
Mike Ade
Nathalie Nunez
Patrick Dougherty
Rachel Hodara
Rose Gabriel
Ryan Rea
Stephanie "Mapu" Kowalski
Tim Garcia